Defense of poesy. Analysis of Sir Philip Sidney's Defense of Poesy 2019-01-20

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Defence of Poesie (Ponsonby, 1595)

defense of poesy

This needs no further to be enlarged; the dullest wit may conceive it. Nay, truly, though I yield that poesy may not only be abused, but that being abused, by the reason of his sweet charming force, it can do more hurt than any other army of words, yet shall it be so far from concluding that the abuse should give reproach to the abused, that contrariwise it is a good reason, that whatsoever, being abused, doth most harm, being rightly used—and upon the right use each thing receiveth his title—doth most good. Sidney pays his homage to Aristotle also. He primarily stated that poetry has an indispensable place in the society as it is a reflection of history, ethics and philosophy. Where the philosophers, as they scorn to delight, so must they be content little to move—saving wrangling whether virtue be the chief or the only good, whether the contemplative or the active life do excel—which Plato and Boethius well knew, and therefore made Mistress Philosophy very often borrow the masking raiment of Poesy. We delight to hear the happiness of our friends and country, at which he were worthy to be laughed at that would laugh.

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The defense of poesy. By Sir Philip Sidney, Kt. (eBook, 1752) [viddy.com]

defense of poesy

I dare undertake, Orlando Furioso or honest King Arthur will never displease a soldier; but the quiddity of ens, and prima materia, will hardly agree with a corselet. But for Erasmus and Agrippa, they had an other foundation then the superficiall part would promise. He did this whole massive sonnet thing first. I know Apuleius did somewhat so, but that is a thing recounted with space of time, not represented in one moment; and I know the ancients have one or two examples of tragi-comedies, as Plautus hath Amphytrio. So that verse being in itself sweet and orderly, and being best for memory, the only handle of knowledge, it must be in jest that any man can speak against it. Such were David in his Psalms; Solomon in his Song of Songs, in his Ecclesiastes and Proverbs; Moses and Deborah in their Hymns; and the writer of Job; which, beside other, the learned Emanuel Tremellius and Franciscus Junius do entitle the poetical part of the Scripture. For the question is, whether the feigned image of poesy, or the regular instruction of philosophy, hath the more force in teaching.

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Full text of defense of poesy ; otherwise known as An apology for

defense of poesy

But that is easily answered: their naming of men is but to make their picture the more lively, and not to build any history. Besides, one word so, as it were, begetting another, as, be it in rime or measured verse, by the former a man shall have a near guess to the follower. Bear for the , September-December 1992. For as for the divine, with all reverence it is ever to be excepted, not onely for having his scope as far beyond any of these, as Eternitie exceedeth a moment: but even for passing ech of these in themselves. Neither let it be deemed too saucy a comparison to balance the highest point of manÂ’s wit with the efficacy of nature; but rather give right honor to the Heavenly Maker of that maker, who, having made man to His own likeness, set him beyond and over all the works of that second nature.

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Literature Frenzy!: The Defense of Poesy by Philip Sidney

defense of poesy

For now they cast Sugar and spice uppon everie dish that is served to the table: like those Indians, not content to weare eare-rings at the fit and naturall place of the eares, but they will thrust Jewels through their nose and lippes, because they will be sure to be fine. Trials of Desire: Renaissance Defenses of Poetry. It is already said, and as I think truly said, it is not riming and versing that makes poesy. Sidney reveres Plato even though he banished the poets. The Sidney family did not always experience a smooth relationship with Queen Elizabeth.

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Critical Analysis of Sir Philip Sidney’s Defense of Poesy

defense of poesy

And that the poet hath the idea is manifest by delivering them forth in such excellency as he had imagined them; which delivering forth in such excellency as he had imagined them; which delivering forth also is not wholly imaginative, as we are wont to say by them that builds castles in air. But these arguments will by few be understood, and by fewer granted; thus much I hope will be given me, that the Greeks with some probability of reason gave him the name above all names of learning. But, more importantly, Sidney's careful analysis of an entire style of literature has long-lasting effects on academia. The latter likewise with his rime striketh a certain music to the ear; and, in fine, since it doth delight, though by another way, it obtaineth the same purpose; there being in either, sweetness, and wanting in neither, majesty. This is one of Sidneys' aphorisms which come directly from Horace see 3 above --what might we learn from the uses of visual and verbal arts, perhaps embedded in one another poetry written to be recited in drama; paintings described in poems, etc.

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The Defense of Poesy

defense of poesy

Defence as an instance of Classical rhetoric in action. And what so much good doth that teaching bring forth—I speak still of moral doctrine—as that it moveth one to do that which it doth teach? Scipio 19 24, 40 27, 43 19. What is at stake then is not only the value of poetry in the sense of its utility, but also its place in a world replete with strife, the contingent and the provisional. Certainly even our Saviour Christ could as well have given the morall common places of uncharitablenesse and humblenesse, as the divine narration of Dives and Lazarus, or of disobedience and mercy, as the heavenly discourse of the lost childe and the gracious Father, but that his through searching wisedom, knew the estate of Dives burning in hell, and Lazarus in Abrahams bosome, would more constantly, as it were, inhabit both the memorie and judgement. He teacheth virtue by certain abstract considerations, but I only bid you follow the footing of them that have gone before you. For these, indeed, do merely make to imitate, and imitate both to delight and teach, and delight to move men to take that goodness in hand, which without delight they would fly as from a stranger; and teach to make them know that goodness whereunto they are moved:—which being the noblest scope to which ever any learning was directed, yet want there not idle tongues to bark at them. Besides these, I do not remember to have seen but few to speak boldly printed, that have poetical sinews in them.

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The Defense of Poesy: Otherwise known as An Apology for Poetry by Philip Sidney

defense of poesy

The late sixteenth century was the period of political tumult. And whereas a man may say, though in universal consideration of doctrine the poet prevaileth, yet that the history, in his saying such a thing was done, doth warrant a man more in that he shall follow,—the answer is manifest: that if he stand upon that was, as if he should argue, because it rained yesterday therefore it should rain to-day, then indeed it hath some advantage to a gross conceit. Now would I fain know, if occasion be presented unto you to serve your prince by such an honest dissimulation, why do you not as well learn it of Xenophon’s fiction as of the other’s verity? Sidney's program of literary reform concerns the connection between art and. Certain poets as Simonides and Pindar, had so prevailed with Heiro the First, that of a tyrant they made him a just king; where Plato could do so little with Dionysius, that he himself of a philosopher was made a slave. Sidney questions the role of poetry in England, asking whether or not English poetry can become a viable form language, showing the juxtaposition between poetry and drama. And even historiographers, although their lips sound of things done, and verity be written in their foreheads, have been glad to borrow both fashion and perchance weight of the poets.

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The Defence of Poesie

defense of poesy

Marrie they that delight in Poesie it selfe, should seek to know what they do, and how they do: and especially looke themselves in an unflattering glasse of reason, if they be enclinable unto it. Who list may read in Plutarch the discourses of Isis and Osiris, of the Cause why Oracles ceased, of the Divine Providence, and see whether the theology of that nation stood not upon such dreams,—which the poets indeed superstitiously observed; and truly, since they had not the light of Christ, did much better in it than the philosophers, who, shaking off superstition, brought in atheism. Now, therefore, it shall not be amiss, first to weigh this latter sort of poetry by his works, and then by his parts; and if in neither of these anatomies he be condemnable, I hope we shall obtain a more favorable sentence. Anger, the Stoics said, was a short madness. Against these none will speak that hath the Holy Ghost in due holy reverence. He is accurate in his assessment of language, and goes astray only when adopting a poetics that runs counter to his own theory.

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