Describe the battle of marathon. Battle of Marathon 2019-01-16

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Which statements accurately describe the Persian Wars?Choose all answers that are correct. A. Athens

describe the battle of marathon

The remaining Persians escaped on their ships and made an attempt to attack what they thought was an undefended Athens. You have only to add your vote to my side and your country will be free - and not free only, but the first state in Greece. The Persians fled back to their ships. The battlefields of Marathon and Thermopylae, while ninety miles from each other, can be and often are combined into a daytrip. The Naxians appealed to the despot of the Ionian city of Miletos, Aristagoras, for assistance. These were annihilated, though at great cost to the Persians. Although the Spartans promised to send military aid to the Athenians, their laws stated they could only do so after the full moon had passed.


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Ancient Greek Battles at Marathon & Thermopylae

describe the battle of marathon

Finally, on the fifth day, the Greeks attacked. However the Persian did not learn from their mistakes at Marathon and repeated them time and time again in the subsequent battles that followed, which is largely part of why they were responsible for their own defeat. The foes facing off at Marathon had two very distinct styles of fighting. The Greeks took it as an encouraging omen that the gods must surely be on their side. Their strategy involved holding a line only a few dozen yards long between a steep hillside and the sea.

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Battle of Marathon Essay Example

describe the battle of marathon

But, Weber argued, this was nothing but speculation. Their hoplites and the citizens of Miletos marched on the Lydian capital of Sardis and sacked it. The Battle of Marathon was significant because it proved to the Greeks that the Persians were not 'invincible', which boosted the moral of the Greek troops, increasing their confidence to incline themselves in a common cause if the Persian attacked again which they would. Expecting little resistance, he sent emissaries to the cities of Greece asking for their submission and demanding offerings of earth and water. The Athenian army consisted almost entirely of hoplites These part-time soldiers were equipped in bronze armour and armed primarily with a spear called a doru and a large bronze-covered shield called an aspis.

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Which statements accurately describe the Persian Wars?Choose all answers that are correct. A. Athens

describe the battle of marathon

The Spartans eventually arrived, but only after the battle was long over. The Battle of Marathon The battle of Marathon has, for millenia now, been firmly planted within the annals of western history. The Battle of Marathon Today, this location is a beautiful pastoral image, but over two millennia ago, it was the site of an epic and important battle. Xerxes intended to do just that and thus moved toward Thermopylae. The fact that the Persian cavalry took no part in the battle is one of the major reasons for the Persian loss and Greek victory at the battle of Marathon. The Greeks, knowing the time for battle had come, began to move forward. Xerxes, on the other hand, had anywhere from 70,000 to 300,000.

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Battle of Thermopylae

describe the battle of marathon

License Written by , published on 14 March 2018 under the following license:. The Persians then moved on to Athens, landing onthe Plain of Marathon. For the man on whom the lot fell to be polemarch at Athens was entitled to give his vote with the ten generals, since anciently the Athenians allowed him an equal right of voting with them. Nineteenth-Century Theories Greece versus Asia: although popular in the classical age, this theme lost relevance in the Hellenistic age. Their victory over the Persian invaders gave the fledgling Greek city states confidence in their ability to defend themselves and belief in their continued existence. An estimated 6,400 Persians were slaughtered while only 192 Greeks were killed. Surveying the advantage that the terrain and size of their force gave to the Persians, the Greek generals hesitated.


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Battle of Thermopylae

describe the battle of marathon

But war became inevitable when the Athenians refused, and the Spartans went even further and killed the Persian envoy. Seeing the Persiancavalry being loaded on ships, the Athenians ran down from thehills where they had been lurking away from the cavalry threat, anddefeated the helpless inferior Persian in … fantry. As stated by Herodotus, the geography of the plain of Marathon was significant in the Persian decision-making. The polemarch at this juncture was Callimachus of Aphidnre; to him therefore Miltiades went, and said: 'With you it rests, Callimachus, either to bring Athens to slavery, or, by securing her freedom, to be remembered by all future generations. The Halicarnassian may in the end turn out to be right, but that is not now at issue: what needs to be stressed is that the framework in which we place the battle of Marathon, was created by Herodotus.

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Battle of Marathon

describe the battle of marathon

He died before he could do this andleft it to his son and successor King Xerxes. In the eighteenth century, however, the famous German art historian Johann Joachim Winckelmann created the modern paradigm that Rome had merely continued Greek culture, and that Athens was the real origin of western civilization. Be that as it may, he did tell the men he had thrashing the sea to revile it in terms you would never hear from a Greek. The Spartan presence at Marathon, however, served to present the battle that had been, or ought to have been, a fight by all Greeks. The second assumption is that the political independence of Greece guaranteed the freedom of its culture. The Athenians stalled for days, anticipating reinforcements promised by Sparta.

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Battle of Marathon: Summary, Facts & Map

describe the battle of marathon

This battle took place in a small coastal town called Marathon, some 25 miles 40 kilometres away from Athens itself. Around the 5th century bc, the Persians under Cyrus the Great had rapidly expanded their domain. Forced to pay tribute to a distant king, feeling the tyrannical push of the Persian governors and encouraged by the Athenians, many of these city-states decided to revolt. Even so, Xerxes put the thoughts of the brevity of life from his mind and ordered the crossing and the invasion of Greece. His development plans were cut short through his assassination by his minister Artabanus a different man than his uncle of the same name who also murdered his son Darius. They were the first of the Greeks, so far as I know, who introduced the custom of charging the enemy at a run, and they were likewise the first who dared to look upon the Persian garb, and to face men clad in that fashion.

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