Frankenstein chapter 7. Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley; Chapter 7 Page 1 2019-02-18

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Frankenstein, Chapter 7

frankenstein chapter 7

But I paused when I reflected on the story that I had to tell. You come to us now to share a misery which nothing can alleviate; yet your presence will, I hope, revive our father, who seems sinking under his misfortune; and your persuasions will induce poor Elizabeth to cease her vain and tormenting self-accusations. My country, my beloved country! Justine, who was upset, confused, and ill, was unable to explain how it had gotten into her pocket or where she'd been when William was killed. Not only does Victor know that the monster is responsible for the death of his brother psychic communication , but the monster was able to find Victor's family via psychic communication. I rely on her innocence as certainly as I do upon my own. Before, I had only imagined the wretchedness of my desolated home; the reality came on me as a new, and a not less terrible, disaster.

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Frankenstein Chapter 7 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

frankenstein chapter 7

As a result, he feels even more angry, self-hating and isolated. The entire family had been on a hike, and William and his older brother Ernest had gone on ahead. I resolved in my minds the events which I had until now sought to forget: the whole train of my progress toward the creation; the appearance of the works of my own hands at my bedside; its departure. It was an historical subject, painted at my father's desire, and represented Caroline Beaufort in an agony of despair, kneeling by the coffin of her dead father. No one would believe it at first; and even now Elizabeth will not be convinced, notwithstanding all the evidence. Who that had seen him bright and joyous in his young beauty, but must weep over his untimely loss! He relays his assertion of Justine's innocence and states that she will be found not guilty. If she is, as you believe, innocent, rely on the justice of our laws, and the activity with which I shall prevent the slightest shadow of partiality.

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Frankenstein Chapter 7 Summary

frankenstein chapter 7

He learns that is accused of the murder with circumstantial evidence. He still remained to me. I threw the letter on the table, and covered my face with my hands. By degrees the calm and heavenly scene restored me, and I continued my journey towards Geneva. Her garb was rustic, and her cheek pale; but there was an air of dignity and beauty, that hardly permitted the sentiment of pity. About five in the morning I discovered my lovely boy, whom the night before I had seen blooming and active in health, stretched on the grass livid and motionless; the print of the murderer's finger was on his neck.

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Frankenstein Chapter 7 Summary

frankenstein chapter 7

No sooner did that idea cross my imagination, than I became convinced of its truth; my teeth chattered, and I was forced to lean against a tree for support. But that would be a cruel kindness, and I dare not do it. Adam's supplication to his Creator: in Paradise Lost Book 8, lines 379-97, Adam asks God for a companion. But that would be a cruel kindness, and I dare not do it. I told the servants not to disturb the family, and went into the library to attend their usual hour of rising. When Victor arrives at the city gates, they are closed, so he must remain outside the city in Secheron until the gates are reopened at dawn.


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Frankenstein Chapter 7 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

frankenstein chapter 7

I considered the being whom I had cast among mankind, and endowed with the will and power to effect purposes of horror, such as the deed which he had now done, nearly in the light of my own vampire, my own spirit let loose from the grave, and forced to destroy all that was dear to me. What do you intend to do? The gates were open, and I hastened to my father's house. Frankenstein knew that the monster was William's murderer and realized with horror the evil he had released into the world. Absence cannot have rendered you callous to our joys and griefs; and how shall I inflict pain on my long absent son? Worried, they searched until dark. My tale was not one to announce publicly; its astounding horror would be looked upon as madness by the vulgar. She was nearly incoherent when they finally got back. Before, I had only imagined the' wretchedness of my desolated home; the reality came on me as a new, and a not less terrible, disaster.


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Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley; Chapter 7 Page 1

frankenstein chapter 7

Also, it is interesting that lightning has such a recurring role in the story. With his newfound ability to read, he soon understands the horrific manner of his own creation and the disgust with which his creator regarded him. It was an historical subject, painted at my father's desire, and represented Caroline Beaufort in an agony of despair, kneeling by the coffin of her dead father. I wept like a child. This passage plays a commentary about the rights of the accused and poor in English society, which is obviously a concern of Shelley's mother and probably a concern of her own.


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Frankenstein

frankenstein chapter 7

Nothing in human shape could have destroyed the fair child. Summary: Chapter 8 Justine confesses to the crime, believing that she will thereby gain salvation, but tells Elizabeth and Victor that she is innocent—and miserable. But she will be tried today, and you will then hear all. I saw him too; he was free last night! No one can conceive the anguish I suffered during the remainder of the night, which I spent, cold and wet, in the open air. Felix visited the Turk in prison and met his daughter who he immediately fell in love with. Enter the house of mourning, my friend, but with kindness and affection for those who love you, and not with hatred for your enemies.

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Vol. 2 Chapters 6 and 7

frankenstein chapter 7

They tell Victor that Justine's trial is today and Victor announces that he has information that will save her. Women continue to play a mostly passive role in the narrative. We were soon joined by Elizabeth. And even if they did believe him, who would be able to catch the monster? He had bruises on his neck and it was evident he'd been strangled. A flash of lightning illuminated the object, and discovered its shape plainly to me; its gigantic stature, and the deformity of its aspect, more hideous than belongs to humanity, instantly informed me that it was the wretch, the filthy daemon, to whom I had given life. It was already dusk before we thought of returning; and then we discovered that William and Ernest, who had gone on before, were not to be found. These reflections determined me, and I resolved to remain silent.

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