Origin of species. Darwin Online: On the Origin of Species 2019-02-20

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The Origin of Species Chapter 3

origin of species

This is generally attributed to vitiated instincts; but how many cultivated plants display the utmost vigour, and yet rarely or never seed! Nevertheless, there is a distinction between Lamarck's theory and Darwin's one: while Darwin's theory stays valid whether acquired traits are transmitted or not, Lamarck's theory becomes inoperative if acquired traits cannot be transmitted. Pigeons, I may add, can be propagated in great numbers and at a very quick rate, and inferior birds may be freely rejected, as when killed they serve for food. We see the value set on animals even by the barbarians of Tierra del Fuego, by their killing and devouring their old women, in times of dearth, as of less value than their dogs. I cannot here enter on the copious details which I have collected on this curious subject; but to show how singular the laws are which determine the reproduction of animals under confinement, I may just mention that carnivorous animals, even from the tropics, breed in this country pretty freely under confinement, with the exception of the plantigrades or bear family; whereas, carnivorous birds, with the rarest exceptions, hardly ever lay fertile eggs. On the other hand, cats, from their nocturnal rambling habits, cannot be matched, and, although so much valued by women and children, we hardly ever see a distinct breed kept up; such breeds as we do sometimes see are almost always imported from some other country, often from islands. Darwin's theory, as presented Darwin opened his argument by pointing to the results of , mostly through though environmental changes, such as more food and protection from predators, were also factors.

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The Origin of Species: Chapter 1

origin of species

No one would expect to raise a first-rate melting pear from the seed of a wild pear, though he might succeed from a poor seedling growing wild, if it had come from a garden-stock. There is some minor bumping and wear to the boards. The following month a second edition of 3,000 copies also sold out, and the book continued selling through successive editions for decades. This one was in excellent condition and had inserted advertisements dated June 1859, in the third variant referred to above. Nevertheless, as our varieties certainly do occasionally revert in some of their characters to ancestral forms, it seems to me not improbable, that if we could succeed in naturalising, or were to cultivate, during many generations, the several races, for instance, of the cabbage, in very poor soil in which case, however, some effect would have to be attributed to the direct action of the poor soil , that they would to a large extent, or even wholly, revert to the wild aboriginal stock.

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Charles Darwin

origin of species

Our oldest cultivated plants, such as wheat, still yield new varieties: our oldest domesticated animals are still capable of rapid improvement or modification. He ruled out exposing himself to an editor or counsel which would have been required to publish in an academic journal. I believe that the conditions of life, from their action on the reproductive system, are so far of the highest importance as causing variability. The fourth is considerably altered. In some few such cases it has been found out that very trifling changes, such as a little more or less water at some particular period of growth, will determine whether or not the plant sets a seed.

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Charles Darwin

origin of species

In many cases this could not be otherwise: thus the inherited peculiarities in the horns of cattle could appear only in the offspring when nearly mature; peculiarities in the silkworm are known to appear at the corresponding caterpillar or cocoon stage. Newly galvanized by the fact that Wallace was nipping at his heels, Darwin threw himself into writing an abstract of his longer manuscript for publication. They believe that every race which breeds true, let the distinctive characters be ever so slight, has had its wild prototype. As he subsequently acknowledged, others before him published brief statements outlining the principle of , but he was not aware of these little known statements until after publication of the Origin. Perhaps the first pouter-pigeon did not inflate its crop much more than the turbit now does the upper part of its oesophagus, a habit which is disregarded by all fanciers, as it is not one of the points of the breed. We see an astonishing improvement in many florists' flowers, when the flowers of the present day are compared with drawings made only twenty or thirty years ago.

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The Origin of Species Quotes by Charles Darwin

origin of species

On November 25th, he writes 'I have been going over the sheets'; on December 14th 'I have been busy in getting a reprint with a very few corrections through the press. The improvement is by no means generally due to crossing different breeds; all the best breeders are strongly opposed to this practice, except sometimes amongst closely allied sub-breeds. Breeders believe that long limbs are almost always accompanied by an elongated head. From the facts collected by Heusinger, it appears that white sheep and pigs are differently affected from coloured individuals by certain vegetable poisons. Such ideas were seen in Britain as attacking the social order, already threatened by the aftermath of the and. The changing social of science—typified by the rise of the freethinking biologist —promised a better reception for. Many of the debates did not center around Darwin's specifically proposed mechanism for evolution — natural selection — but rather on the concept of evolution in general.

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Origin of Species

origin of species

The explanation, I think, is simple: from long-continued study they are strongly impressed with the differences between the several races; and though they well know that each race varies slightly, for they win their prizes by selecting such slight differences, yet they ignore all general arguments, and refuse to sum up in their minds slight differences accumulated during many successive generations. A high degree of variability is obviously favourable, as freely giving the materials for selection to work on; not that mere individual differences are not amply sufficient, with extreme care, to allow of the accumulation of a large amount of modification in almost any desired direction. A sensitive Darwin, making no personal appearances, let , by now a good friend, manage that part of the debate. The volume had taken Darwin more than twenty years to publish, in part because he envisioned the storm of controversy it was certain to unleash. Darwin now had immense scientific and social authority, and his place in the parish was assured when he was sworn in as a in 1857. Some individuals put forward evolutionary concepts. They fail to understand that the fact that evolution has withstood many years of such questioning really means it is about as certain as facts can get.

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The Legacy of Darwin's the Origin of

origin of species

The book was highly controversial, as it contradicted the then-prevailing theories of establishment scientists and theologians, as well as popularly held religious beliefs. The idea that species might evolve, i. But I am strongly inclined to suspect that the most frequent cause of variability may be attributed to the male and female reproductive elements having been affected prior to the act of conception. It is even more important to notice that he did not suggest that every individual with a favorable variation must be selected, or that the selected or favored animals were better or higher, but merely that they were more adapted to their surroundings. But as his opinions fluctuated greatly at different periods, and as he does not enter on the causes or means of the transformation of species, I need not here enter on details. But Mr Horner's researches have rendered it in some degree probable that man sufficiently civilized to have manufactured pottery existed in the valley of the Nile thirteen or fourteen thousand years ago; and who will pretend to say how long before these ancient periods, savages, like those of Tierra del Fuego or Australia, who possess a semi-domestic dog, may not have existed in Egypt? Many slight differences might, and indeed do now, arise amongst pigeons, which are rejected as faults or deviations from the standard of perfection of each breed.

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On the Origin of Species (1859)

origin of species

A new belief developed that the original pair of every species had been brought into existence by God not so long ago. Fortunately, Wallace turned out to be happy with the joint presentation; he knew that Darwin had been working on species for years and felt honored to have his work presented alongside Darwin's in front of a prestigious society. Some little effect may, perhaps, be attributed to the direct action of the external conditions of life, and some little to habit; but he would be a bold man who would account by such agencies for the differences of a dray and race horse, a greyhound and bloodhound, a carrier and tumbler pigeon. Gingerich has used it recently in a discussion of the speed and pattern of evolution at a species level Amer. Darwin studied not only living, breeding pigeons, but also dead ones; for a while, his workshop became a shop of horrors as he killed and 'skeletonized' pigeons of all varieties and ages, not to mention the occasional rabbit or chicken, studying the sometimes striking differences in structure between different varieties. So it is in India.

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Origin of Species

origin of species

When a deviation appears not unfrequently, and we see it in the father and child, we cannot tell whether it may not be due to the same original cause acting on both; but when amongst individuals, apparently exposed to the same conditions, any very rare deviation, due to some extraordinary combination of circumstances, appears in the parent say, once amongst several million individuals and it reappears in the child, the mere doctrine of chances almost compels us to attribute its reappearance to inheritance. Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh 4: 1860 274-291. It is a seminal work in scientific literature and a landmark work in evolutionary biology. Darwin himself considered that it was merely corrected, but the next printing, in 1861, was called the third edition on the title page. Finally, in this edition, the opening words of the Historical Sketch read 'I will here a give a brief sketch.

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